RIP Thread!!

  • ^ I was about to mention about Burke Shelley, it's very sad news.


    Members of Motorhead and Metallica, both very influenced by Budgie, have been paying tributes.

    Abandon all reason

  • Sorry to hear about your loss NSOV....:(

  • Gary Waldhorn, most famous as David Horton in the Vicar of Dibley, but a workhorse of UK TV throughout his career. He turns up in episodes of many of my old favourites, including Space 1999, Enemy At the Door, where he played an occasionally recurring role, and bizarrely, the day before he died, he appeared on ITV4 in a 1975 episode of The Sweeney, where he played a scene with Liz Smith who was also in "Dibley" with him.


    RIP

    Ian


    Works with chess - Not with life

  • Gary Waldhorn, most famous as David Horton in the Vicar of Dibley, but a workhorse of UK TV throughout his career. He turns up in episodes of many of my old favourites, including Space 1999, Enemy At the Door, where he played an occasionally recurring role, and bizarrely, the day before he died, he appeared on ITV4 in a 1975 episode of The Sweeney, where he played a scene with Liz Smith who was also in "Dibley" with him.


    RIP

    RIP :(


    Knew him well on the shows!..

  • Sorry to hear about your loss NSOV....:(

    Thanks Noni for the condolences. :) Even though it's technically Jaap and his family's loss, losing Anja still feels a bit like losing a relative. They were both at my Mum and Dad's 25th anniversary in 2015 for example. They're Dutch (they live just outside of Rotterdam) so they couldn't visit all the time, but when they did it was a very happy experience.

  • RIP meat loaf. One of the true greats and one of the good guys. I was obsessed for quite a while and still love most of his music. Especially the synth heavy mid-80s material that was more atmospheric. I saw him around 96 or so, and it was an incredible performance. He put his all into every moment of every show. There was little pretence about him in person unlike 99% of big stars. I'm sad at the thought that he's no longer here. Rock on, big man.

  • RIP meat loaf. One of the true greats and one of the good guys. I was obsessed for quite a while and still love most of his music. Especially the synth heavy mid-80s material that was more atmospheric. I saw him around 96 or so, and it was an incredible performance. He put his all into every moment of every show. There was little pretence about him in person unlike 99% of big stars. I'm sad at the thought that he's no longer here. Rock on, big man.

    Nice tribute. I'm not a fan but there's a place for operatic rock bombast and he was hugely liked. Plus as you say, by all accounts a decent chap. It is sad he's left us.

    Abandon all reason

  • I knew I would be back here. I woke up this morning to the news that this man had died and wrote my earlier, heartfelt tribute on the train on the way to work. At random times during the day, my eyes welled up. I had the same lyrics popping into my head all day long and I'm not sure why:


    "she used her body just like a bandage

    She used my body just like a wound...

    I'll never know why she disappeared,

    And I can see her rising up out of the back seat now, just like an angel rising up from a tomb"


    I'm young enough to have somehow escaped losing any of the major figures of my youth. Until now. I love listening to music, reading books, and watching TV and movies. There is only a small handful, 7 or 8, musicians, authors, actors or directors whose death could really upset me. This was one.


    Meatloaf's music was deeply uncool and I was a deeply uncool kid, and it spoke to me (a lot like Genesis!). Bat out of hell 2 was a seminal, massive album for me as a person. I look at the comments in the guardian on his obituary and see phenomenal stories of what a kind, generous man he was. The anecdote where a support band failed to show so he went out early and played for four hours. The venue medic who said he was the only artist who went back there to thank them.


    The best insights of all were from him of course. That rock and roll is a joke, so laugh at him. That being a celebrity is bullshit and not his style at all. That he saw himself more like a plumber who had a job to do and wanted to do it well.


    Unsurprisingly I listened to a lot of his music tonight. I've never felt big tears rolling down my face as an adult but I'm not afraid to say I did tonight. A big piece of my childhood died today.

    He was a very loud, cartoonish, down to earth gem. His discography is littered with treasures much beyond the radio ballads and bombastic rock.


    Sorry for coming back for a second bite at the cherry here. The emotion is closer to what it feels like when a loved pet dies than when a random famous person dies. Legitimate grief. Whatever afterlife there is got a whole lot louder today in the best way possible. Rip meatloaf.

  • Barry Cryer, one of the funniest men ever to grace planet Earth. Back in the 1970's he co-wrote "Hello Cheeky" with fellow co-star John Junkin, and performed it with him and Tim Brooke-Taylor. Barry is the last of the 3 to go. He also, as a result of I'm Sorry I haven't a Clue, came up with "Hamish and Dougal - You'll have had your tea?" both of these on BBC Radio, and doubtless available on the beeb's website, probably with PC editing. He also, with Michael MacKintyre's father, helped write the Kenny Everett TV shows - bringing us characters like Gizzard Puke and Cupid Stunt (apparently the BBC were offered a choice of that name or Mary Hinge! Hard to believe they went that way way with it!)


    RIP Barry, you were one of the best.

    Ian


    Works with chess - Not with life

  • I feel privileged to have attended many recordings of the brilliant I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue and also saw him do an Edinburgh Fringe show just a few years back. He was one of the great natural comedians. The list of performers he wrote for and worked with is astonishing. The universally warm affection of all the tributes today shows how loved and respected he remains. I shed a few tears today.


    The world seems a slightly gloomier place without Barry Cryer in it.

    Abandon all reason

  • He played a huge part in what many still regard as one of the most remarkable debut albums ever. King Crimson wouldn't have happened without him. Very sad loss.

    Abandon all reason