TotW 10/20/2018 - 10/26/2018: PETER GABRIEL - Here Comes The Flood

  • What do you think about "Here Comes The Flood"? 15

    1. 15 points - outstanding! (5) 33%
    2. 13 points - very good - (3) 20%
    3. 11 points - good (3) 20%
    4. 14 points - very good (2) 13%
    5. 12 points - good + (1) 7%
    6. 10 points - good - (1) 7%
    7. 09 points - satisfactory + (0) 0%
    8. 08 points - satisfactory (0) 0%
    9. 07 points - satisfactory - (0) 0%
    10. 06 points - sufficient + (0) 0%
    11. 05 points - sufficient (0) 0%
    12. 04 points - sufficient - (0) 0%
    13. 03 points - poor + (0) 0%
    14. 02 points - poor (0) 0%
    15. 01 point - poor - (0) 0%
    16. 00 points - abysmal (0) 0%

    PETER GABRIEL - Here Comes The Flood


    Year: 1977

    Album: Peter Gabriel I ("Car") [album review]

    Working title: unknown

    Credits: Gabriel

    Lyrics: Yes

    Length: 5:54

    Musicians: (tba)

    Played Live: 1978, 1980, 1982, 1983, 1986, 1987, 1993, 1994, 2002, 2003, 2004

    mp3 downloads:

    Cover versions: Bette Midler


    Notes: So, which version? The intimate version, with Gabriel playing the piano solo live under a single spot in the darkness - or the version on his first solo album, where a joint attack by drums, guitar and an orchestra strive to give the chorus the monumental force of a huge rock anthem? Our Solomonic answer must be: Both of them.



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    ...cried a voice in the crowd.


  • Isn't there a third version with Robert Fripp? I'd prefer a mixture of the original version and the later piano version.

    Oh and by the way, there's another cover version by Dune & The London Session Orchestra with singer Tina Lacebal (on the album Forever and ever, 1999), that's how I got to know the song at first.

  • I am in the camp that prefers the intimate live versions or the version that appears on Fripp's Exposure.

    Having said that I don't dislike the original. It's just another track on PG1 that, in my view, seems to have more layers than needs to be there.

    Otherwise, it's a decent closing track to that debut album.

  • I am in the camp that prefers the intimate live versions or the version that appears on Fripp's Exposure.

    Having said that I don't dislike the original. It's just another track on PG1 that, in my view, seems to have more layers than needs to be there.

    Otherwise, it's a decent closing track to that debut album.

    I completely agree.


    The piano & vocal one (not the Fripp one) is also on Hit/Miss. That's the one I include on my PG compilation.


    I have a vivid memory of this song. I was 14 and had not long started going to gigs. I went to see PG at London Hammersmith Odeon, March 1980. This was where I was sat next to and chatted with Phil Collins, and was rebuffed by Fripp when I went to ask for an autograph (he literally ran away, his legs a blur).


    Those minor distractions aside, it was a great gig, and encores done, the band trooped off, house lights came up, roadies on stage dismantling stuff, people started leaving.


    Then PG strode back on, sat at the piano and performed Flood solo. All the auditorium lights were on, many people had already left, others paused in the aisles while those of us still there got to enjoy this seemingly impromptu performance.


    My memory of that is one of the reasons I'll always prefer the solo version.

    Abandon all reason

  • Like his album version, and the Fripp album version (on which Fripp does not appear, I presume)

    Ian


    There is a church bell

    That rings on the hour

    Filling the streets

    Stopping the world awhile

  • I don't know the íntimate version. But the album version is one of my favourite Gabriel songs. Moody & apocalyptic, great melody, great vocal, Everything you could wish for. Outstanding.

  • Like his album version, and the Fripp album version (on which Fripp does not appear, I presume)

    Fripp does play on the Exposure version, which is otherwise just piano and vocal but there's a purely piano and vocal one on PG's Hit/Miss compilation. I don't know if that one's the Exposure version but Fripless, or a wholly re-done one.

    Abandon all reason

  • 14 points from me.

    The original studio album version always tends to be forgotten, since Gabriel only plays the 1990 piano version these days. Nevertheless, I always found this original version was very powerful and intense. One of his landmark songs.

  • My familiarity with PG's solo work is limited, so I only know the original version. But I consider it a definite highlight of his rather uneven first album.

    Monsieur Neddy wears spectacles in bed, that he may see dreams more clearly.

    -- "Dream Gerrard," Traffic

  • Fripp does play on the Exposure version, which is otherwise just piano and vocal but there's a purely piano and vocal one on PG's Hit/Miss compilation. I don't know if that one's the Exposure version but Fripless, or a wholly re-done one.

    Just played it, yes, Fripp is there, though it doesn't add much.

    Ian


    There is a church bell

    That rings on the hour

    Filling the streets

    Stopping the world awhile

  • I love this song overall, moody and poignant. The original album version is a bit bombastic and over-the-top (Bob Ezrin is the producer and I keep thinking of the more heavy-handed moments on Pink Floyd's The Wall). I prefer the more stark version on Fripp's Exposure, although Fripp's guitar additions don't really enhance the song. The later piano-only versions are lovely, but Peter doesn't sing the original melody for the choruses, opting for a lower range melody that doesn't work as well. His voice is richer in this later versions, but I wish he would stick with the original melody. Somewhere in-between were the live versions on the So tour with the original melody, but these versions were unfortunately abbreviated.


    There is a nice piano-only version on a Kate Bush special from the late 70s that you can find on YouTube.

    Edited 2 times, last by Dr. John ().

  • I come to this song from a different angle, I guess, in that I heard the version on Hit before I heard the album version. I actually thought the Hit version "was" the album version. What a surprise when I listened to the original! That being said, I feel that the original is over-produced and not anywhere near as powerful as the stripped down version.


    This song is actually one of the most powerful songs I've ever heard which is surprising in that it's just piano and voice. The lyrics and the passion with which they are delivered (not to mention the subject matter) nearly move me to tears at times. Because of its power, I actually include this song in my 5K race mixes along with tracks by Rush, Metallica, Pearl Jam and Green Day.


    It's a 15 for me.

  • Without a doubt - 15 points. It's actually nice to revisit the old band version, it has a certain different feel and an amazing power. I would love to hear that version today with a full band. Nevertheless, his piano version is also amazing - and also worth 15 points.

  • First heard on Alan Freeman's Friday Night Rock Show (or was it Saturday Night?). it blew me away and I will always prefer the big production of the album version. I love the way Down The Dolce Vita segues into the track.