GENESIS - Come Rain Or Shine 2007 tour documentary

  • I watched the 2007 tour documentary again recently - after quite some time. It brought back some nice memories and also the excitement back then to see the guys back on tour together.


    What do you think about Come Rain Or Shine?


    This is our review:


    https://www.genesis-news.com/c…tary-DVD-review-s155.html



  • I do like this doc. And not just because it's the only surviving disc from my copy of When In Rome. Disc 1 snapped when I tried to prise it out of the case, disc 2 has vanished (this was all some time after I had bought it and and watched it a few times).


    Certain bits always stick in my mind. One is the early rehearsals and PC struggling to reach the high notes in Cinema Show, and the idea of doing the whole song is abandoned. Another is the possible stage designs being discussed, and the absolute lunacy of the 'ascending stage' idea. Even Banks's fear of heights aside, what the hell kind of stupid idea was that?!


    It always makes me chuckle when the band are shown the model for the eventual design, and Rutherford remarks that the stage looks quite small, causing Tony Smith to exclaim in disbelief. I knew exactly what MR meant, ie the playing area was tiny in comparison with the whole sweep of the design, but he can't seem to get this across. My first thought when I walked on to the pitch at Old Trafford was that the actual stage looked really small, so I totally got what MR meant.


    The whole 'button-pusher' thing stands out. That guy's supervisor doesn't come across all that well, which may just be the way the film is edited. You also get a strong sense of Smith as someone you really don't want to get on the wrong side of. He doesn't come across as a Peter Grant - well, not quite (or even an Ian Faith!) - but a tough nut all the same and unsurprisingly, given he has been a successful manager of a global rock band for several decades.


    Possibly my favourite moment is when the band sit and impassively watch pyro flares being tested. We aren't shown the flares, we just hear the roar and see the orange glow playing across their expressionless faces. It's a great piece of documentary filming.


    The stools being auditioned is another favourite sequence.


    I have to round off with Collins, driving along: "We could be so much better... if we just had a little bit more talent."

    Abandon all reason

  • I like this documentary too.


    I can't add much to what was written above and in the site review, but it is one I can watch repeatedly and still enjoy it.

    Stepping out the back way, hoping nobody sees...

  • I am always fascinated with any behind-the-scenes music documentaries. I like learning more about the processes that go into the final result. I like seeing the band struggle with remembering how to play things, their camaraderie and banter, the planning behind an elaborate stage show.

  • I also enjoyed watching this. I was actually hoping for more footage of the NYC rehearsals in 2006, since they tried a couple of odd tracks there.

    But all in all a great one, many things really made me laugh.

  • Come Rain or Shine is perhaps one of the best and most honest documentaries out there, but considering there was over 160 hours filmed. One would sometimes like to see more of it.


    A brilliant part of the package of When In Rome.


    One of the better releases by the band in the last 10 years.


    Mark

  • I enjoyed it. It was interesting watching them get reacquainted with all the music they had forgotten. Mike and Tony were divas (I felt sorry for some of the crew members having to meet their demands) and Phil just wanted to rock.

  • If CW doesn't mind me weighing in I think 'divas' refers to them both being such perfectionists. They picked holes in everything to do with the lighting , sound, and so on. They were both extremely hard taskmasters, whereas Phil didn't seem so bothered by all that.

  • If CW doesn't mind me weighing in I think 'divas' refers to them both being such perfectionists. They picked holes in everything to do with the lighting , sound, and so on. They were both extremely hard taskmasters, whereas Phil didn't seem so bothered by all that.

    They didn't come across to me like that at all, but to whatever extent they were perfectionists then all power to them as I'm sure it contributed to their stage shows being so pleasingly distinctive and, well, Genesis-y over the years.

    Abandon all reason