Posts by martinus

    What about the 1983 album by our favourite band?


    It just says Genesis on the cover, but is it called Genesis and have they left out the band name, or is it just the band's name? Same question for Abba (1975), Big Blue Ball (2008) ... and many other albums where the title is the band's name (or vice versa).


    Enya's Watermark does not have the title on the cover, IIRC. Neither do Neneh Cherry's Raw Like Sushi and the original version of Stiltskin's She.

    Nothing wrong with some well-crafted pop and no need to explain it. That said, I much prefer her post-PWL stuff.

    I agree, but Kylie's debut album was anything but well-crafted pop. It was the musical equivalent of the cheapest variety of industrially produced sweets, nothing but lots of sugar and flavouring chemicals in very loud colours.


    Your bringing up the distinction between the first LP and the first CD gives me an opportunity to atone for my lack of taste. My first CD was Nursery Cryme, bought about a year before I got my first CD player.

    PETER GABRIEL - Red Rain
    Year: 1986
    Album: So [review]
    Working title: unknown
    Credits: Gabriel
    Lyrics: Yes
    Length: 05:40
    Musicians: (tba)
    Played Live: 1986, 1987, 1993, 1994, 1996, 1998, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2009, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014
    mp3 downloads: iTunes
    Cover versions:
    - Lydia Grey (album? year?)
    - Ill Nino (The undercover sessions, 2007)
    - Queensryche(Take cover, 2007)

    Notes: Red Rain is the opening track of Peter Gabriel's commercially most successful album, So. Its unusual rhythm has become a trademark for the song - and has been the reason why Peter Gabriel screwed it up at various live shows. The song has been played at almost every show since 1986.

    We invite you to share interesting facts and tidbits about this track. Let's look at the track in the context of the band's / the artist's history, at the music, the songwriting and all other aspects that are relevant for this track. Please do stick to the discussion of the track above. Comparisons to other tracks are okay, but remember that the other track you may be keen to talk about has or will have its own Track Of The Week thread. If you spot a mistake or if you can close a gap in the fact sheet above please feel free to contact martinus or Christian about it; we will gladly add and improve!
    PHIL COLLINS - Like China
    Year: 1982
    Album: Hello, I Must Be Going! [review]
    Working title: unknown
    Credits: Phil Collins
    Lyrics: Yes
    Length: 5:05
    Musicians: (tba)
    Played Live: 1982, 1983, 1985
    Cover versions: none

    Notes: Daryl Stuermer's unmistakable guitar intro starts off a song that is quite different from the rest of the album as far as the subject matter is concerned. There is no heartache, no pain of separation, no anger, no sorrow, and the song is not about the People's Republic of China, either. It is a teenager trying to seduce his girl-friend and promising to handle her as gently as china porcelain.
    From Phil's very first solo concert at The Hague, Netherlands, in 1982 to the end of the No Jacket Required tour this song was a fixture in the set. After that, it was shelved for a good reason: A Phil Collins that was nearly 40 at the time of the Serious tour could not really convincingly present these lyrics (not to mention any later tours). How well the song, its music and its subject matter, have aged, is up to you to assess now.


    We invite you to share interesting facts and tidbits about this track. Let's look at the track in the context of the band's / the artist's history, at the music, the songwriting and all other aspects that are relevant for this track. Please do stick to the discussion of the track above. Comparisons to other tracks are okay, but remember that the other track you may be keen to talk about has or will have its own Track Of The Week thread. If you spot a mistake or if you can close a gap in the fact sheet above please feel free to contact martinus or Christian about it; we will gladly add and improve!
    GENESIS - Your Own Special Way
    Year: 1976
    Album: Wind & Wuthering [review]
    Working title: unknown
    Credits: Rutherford
    Lyrics: Yes
    Length: 06:18
    Musicians: Banks, Collins, Hackett, Rutherford
    Played Live: 1977, 1986
    Cover versions: Steve Hackett, John Wetton

    Notes: Rutherford created the band's first real love song. But of course they could not do it in four minutes, and the verses had to have an odd time signature. Interestingly, Wind & Wuthering also has a love song penned by Tony Banks, Afterglow. His song has an end of the world feel as opposed to Rutherford's romantic declaration of love.


    We invite you to share interesting facts and tidbits about this track. Let's look at the track in the context of the band's / the artist's history, at the music, the songwriting and all other aspects that are relevant for this track. Please do stick to the discussion of the track above. Comparisons to other tracks are okay, but remember that the other track you may be keen to talk about has or will have its own Track Of The Week thread. If you spot a mistake or if you can close a gap in the fact sheet above please feel free to contact martinus or Christian about it; we will gladly add and improve!

    My first LP was Kylie Minogue's debut album. What can I say? I was young, and I lacked the taste.


    First CD was the grey-frame version of Nursery Cryme. About half a year before I got my first CD player. I'd ask a friend to copy the CD to cassette tapes. With C90 cassettes that meant I did not get to hear the final song of TLLDOB until I had my own CD player... ah, those memories.

    STEVE HACKETT - The Steppes
    Year: 1980
    Album: Defector
    Working title: unknown
    Credits: Hackett
    Lyrics: None
    Length: 6:47 (Tokyo Tapes)
    Musicians: (tba)
    Played Live: (tba)
    Cover versions: none

    Notes: The bass guitar sticks under the notes of this piece like heavy clay, while the keyboards and the guitar imitate the endlessly waving hills of The Steppes. The track is so popular that Hackett keeps publishing it on live albums. Our Track Of The Week takes you into The Steppes.


    We invite you to share interesting facts and tidbits about this track. Let's look at the track in the context of the band's / the artist's history, at the music, the songwriting and all other aspects that are relevant for this track. Please do stick to the discussion of the track above. Comparisons to other tracks are okay, but remember that the other track you may be keen to talk about has or will have its own Track Of The Week thread. If you spot a mistake or if you can close a gap in the fact sheet above please feel free to contact martinus or Christian about it; we will gladly add and improve!
    GENESIS - Silver Rainbow
    Year: 1983
    Album: Genesis [album review]
    Working title: Adam Ant
    Credits: Banks, Collins, Rutherford
    Lyrics: Yes
    Length: 04:31
    Musicians: Tony Banks, Phil Collins, Mike Rutherford
    Played Live: never
    Cover versions: none

    Notes
    : Most songs from the second side of Genesis' 1983 album have rather been neglected. The band themselves never rated that side very high. Silver Rainbow does have a number of fans, some even consider it a secret hit. Is it?


    We invite you to share interesting facts and tidbits about this track. Let's look at the track in the context of the band's / the artist's history, at the music, the songwriting and all other aspects that are relevant for this track. Please do stick to the discussion of the track above. Comparisons to other tracks are okay, but remember that the other track you may be keen to talk about has or will have its own Track Of The Week thread. If you spot a mistake or if you can close a gap in the fact sheet above please feel free to contact martinus or Christian about it; we will gladly add and improve!

    But regarding the reader being able to vicariously experience the Lamb show through the recollections of those who were on "the fringe", I don't think that you can get better than the many bootlegs out there, most of which seem to paint a much more generous picture of how well the album was received than the members of the band would have us believe.

    ... than all members of the band would have us believe... those sodding five detractors of their own work.


    Anyway, you may be right if you are only after the sound. For the sound and the stage show you would better turn to re-stagings of The Lamb by The Musical Box. And where would you go to hear about the roadie's experience or the memories of the album art designers...?

    The book is worth having, though perhaps not quite for the amount I paid. It does not do the trick all on its own, but neither does Holm-Hudson's book.


    As I realize that this is a debate I'm having with my own review once removed, as it were, I begin to doubt the point of the debate.

    ANTHONY PHILLIPS - Which Way The Wind Blows
    Year: 1977
    Album: The Geese And The Ghost [review of the 2008 remaster]
    Working title: unknown
    Credits: Phillips
    Lyrics: Yes
    Length: 5:52
    Musicians: Anthony Phillips, Phil Collins, Mike Rutherford
    Played Live: never
    Cover versions: none

    Notes: Anthony Phillips's debut album came out only in 1977, but The Geese & The Ghost became an instant prog classic and won much praise in the music press. Ant got his friend Mike Rutherford and Phil Collins to play on this album; Collins also sings on this track.


    We invite you to share interesting facts and tidbits about this track. Let's look at the track in the context of the band's / the artist's history, at the music, the songwriting and all other aspects that are relevant for this track. Please do stick to the discussion of the track above. Comparisons to other tracks are okay, but remember that the other track you may be keen to talk about has or will have its own Track Of The Week thread. If you spot a mistake or if you can close a gap in the fact sheet above please feel free to contact martinus or Christian about it; we will gladly add and improve!

    Well, Hackett has not done much detraction in this book, so I would suggest that argument is missing the point here.


    As for "why so-and-so", the answer is likely to be "because they were up for it and ready to contribute". Which is, with the exception of that he-wit, not necessarily a bad thing. And it is not terrible that Kirkman has no soundbites from messieurs Gabriel, Collins, Rutherford or Banks. Remember, Kirkman's aim has never been to "tell the one, true and definitive history of The Lamb", but to show the reader what "it was like to experience a Genesis Lamb show live". For this, it is probably much better to get people from the fringe to tell their story. The people in the eye of the storm are frequently the least suited to talk about its impact (that passage from Chapter & Verse comes to mind where, circa Foxtrot or Selling, someone from the audience tells Steve quite excitedly that, at the end of Supper's Ready, they saw God - and he replies: "Great. So you saw God. I was trying to get the notes right").

    ATTW3 is not my favourite Genesis album by far, but I do like many of the songs on their own. Many Too Many comes to mind. The Lady Lies (well, the live version of it).

    I used to think that Snowbound was a cozy-before-the-fireplace-while-it's-snowing-gently-outside winter fantasy - until I saw an interpretation of the song that argued very convincingly that the "snowman" is, in fact, someone who has frozen to death in the harsh winter climate. Now its deceivingly sweet melody has grown rather scary undertones.


    PHIL COLLINS - We Fly So Close
    Year: 1993
    Album: Both Sides [review]
    Working title: unknown
    Credits: Collins
    Lyrics: Yes
    Length: 07:34
    Musicians: Phil Collins
    Played Live: never
    Cover versions: none

    Notes: Collins's 1993 album had the flair of Face Value and still was an album that divided the fans. Collins played all instruments, which gave the album a reduced and (intentionally) imperfect sound. We Fly So Close is one of the secret gems in Collins's solo repertoire. The song was not released as a single, has never been played live - and at seven and a half minutes it equals Genesis song lengths.

    We invite you to share interesting facts and tidbits about this track. Let's look at the track in the context of the band's / the artist's history, at the music, the songwriting and all other aspects that are relevant for this track. Please do stick to the discussion of the track above. Comparisons to other tracks are okay, but remember that the other track you may be keen to talk about has or will have its own Track Of The Week thread. If you spot a mistake or if you can close a gap in the fact sheet above please feel free to contact martinus or Christian about it; we will gladly add and improve!

    In addition to (and perhaps in contradiction to) what I said in my re-assessment of ATTW3 I am also going to use the term "transitional album", but I have come to think that the "transition album period" extends across Duke and Abacab, too. And Then There Were Three is the band re-configuring as a trio. It shows the band are very aware of where they were coming from and very unsure about where they want to go. They try out stuff. Duke sees them exploring another musical direction; Abacab yet another, and this time a radically different direction; from the self-titled album onwards there is something I would, with some slight hesitation, tend to call stability (which is not, repeat: not, stagnation). And Then There Were Three has the additional burden of Mike having to find his feet in the big shoes Steve Hackett left as lead guitarist.

    It is, perhaps, also worth noting that Peter Gabriel is going through a similar transition on his first two solo albums - almost simultaneously to ATWW3.