Rolling Stones article (20 insanely great Genesis songs...)

  • Forgive me if there's another thread discussing this RS article; I've seen it before and came across it again recently prompting me to post. I think they chose some deep cuts I'd definitely have if I made a playlist of twenty Genesis songs. Feeding the fire, you might recall, evidence of Autumn, the Brazilian ... very unusual to see these songs discussed outside of a fan forum!


    Not sure about On The Shoreline however.


    https://www.rollingstone.com/m…pet-crawlers-1999-148785/

  • Forgive me if there's another thread discussing this RS article; I've seen it before and came across it again recently prompting me to post. I think they chose some deep cuts I'd definitely have if I made a playlist of twenty Genesis songs. Feeding the fire, you might recall, evidence of Autumn, the Brazilian ... very unusual to see these songs discussed outside of a fan forum!


    Not sure about On The Shoreline however.


    https://www.rollingstone.com/m…pet-crawlers-1999-148785/

    I don't think the RS piece features but we do have Genesis In The Media thread.

    Abandon all reason

  • Yes, I've read this article before and it's spot on. By the way, what is this phrase "deep cuts" that I've been hearing lately? What does it mean? I have to say, I don't subscribe to these faddish phrases - I remember when "game changer" was on everyone's lips way back when and I turned my nose up at that too!

  • Yes, I've read this article before and it's spot on. By the way, what is this phrase "deep cuts" that I've been hearing lately? What does it mean? I have to say, I don't subscribe to these faddish phrases - I remember when "game changer" was on everyone's lips way back when and I turned my nose up at that too!

    Deep cuts usually means lesser known songs by a band. Ones not getting much if any radio play and usually only really appreciated by big fans of a band. Casual fans won't be familiar with a band's "deep cuts" but they're often favorites of some hard core fans.

  • By the way, what is this phrase "deep cuts" that I've been hearing lately? What does it mean? I have to say, I don't subscribe to these faddish phrases - I remember when "game changer" was on everyone's lips way back when and I turned my nose up at that too!

    Yes I've only just recently started hearing that but in the context I realised what it meant.


    The one I've heard for a few years and which, admittedly disproportionately, irritates me is "drop" as in "they dropped a new album/tune". Also, when someone's done really well at something they "smashed it" 🤢 Both those make me shudder.


    The one could follow the other - someone drops something and smashes it.

    Abandon all reason

  • Deep cuts usually means lesser known songs by a band. Ones not getting much if any radio play and usually only really appreciated by big fans of a band. Casual fans won't be familiar with a band's "deep cuts" but they're often favorites of some hard core fans.

    That explains why Jon Favreau referred to a scene in one of the Star Wars films as a "deep cut" in a recent documentary I watched. Who comes up with these idioms? I'd love to know so I can smack them upside the head as a reminder that the language was working perfectly well before they started dicking about with it.

  • Who comes up with these idioms? I'd love to know so I can smack them upside the head as a reminder that the language was working perfectly well before they started dicking about with it.

    That said, I wonder if Elizabethans got irritated by that pesky Shakespeare coming up with hundreds of words and phrases - sighing and rolling their eyes at 'laughter', 'eyeballs' and 'pure as the driven snow'. (You could say he dropped loads of new words and in terms of linguistic innovation, he smashed it).


    One of the first times I remember reacting to a word that was new to me was in the late 80s when I heard someone say "we need to prioritise this". I wasn't irritated so much as baffled and actually thought, has he just turned a noun into a verb?! Then I started noticing words being repurposed, one of the first ones I remember being "I want to share something with you" meaning essentially they wanted to tell me something. (And I bet back then I wouldn't have heard of let alone said "repurposed" either).

    Abandon all reason

  • That explains why Jon Favreau referred to a scene in one of the Star Wars films as a "deep cut" in a recent documentary I watched. Who comes up with these idioms? I'd love to know so I can smack them upside the head as a reminder that the language was working perfectly well before they started dicking about with it.

    Haha, so "dicking about" is a perfectly fine idiom? :/ Sorry man but that comes off as just a wee bit hypocritical.


    As for "deep cuts" it's been around for a while and while I agree some idioms are a bit much and we could do without them, this one kind of fits for me, and it doesn't bother me at all.


    IE, a track on an album has been called a "cut" for as long as I can remember, and sometimes you have to dig deep on some albums to hear a gem you wouldn't normally hear on the radio. Put them together and "deep cuts" works perfectly fine to me.

  • Here are a few more fine idioms that'll knock yer socks off -


    Avoid them like the plague

    Nip it in the bud

    Think outside the box

    Dead as a door nail

    Tickled pink

    Close but no cigar

    Raining cats and dogs

    Beat around the bush

    Cup of Joe

    Out on a limb

    Jump the gun


    There are a million more used every single day by your average Joe. I believe I've used them all...including 'tickled pink' :D

  • That explains why Jon Favreau referred to a scene in one of the Star Wars films as a "deep cut" in a recent documentary I watched. Who comes up with these idioms? I'd love to know so I can smack them upside the head as a reminder that the language was working perfectly well before they started dicking about with it.

    It works perfectly well after they started dicking about with it too. Ever notice how we don't speak or write exactly like they did in the 1600s? Language isn't static unless it's dead. Apart from that I don't remember a time that I didn't know what a deep cut was, ie I don't see how it could be a controversial thing. I dislike buzzwords (precision medicine, actualize, move the needle and the absolute, most grievous of all, PARADIGM SHIFT 🤮. Also, do not circle back to me, never 'loop me in' and stay the hell away from my radar). But I don't think deep cuts is buzzy at all.


    Also, I didn't know about the media thread. Clearly, because I didn't bother my arse looking carefully enough. Sorry bout that mr moderator man!


    Feeding the fire anyone? Love that middle bit with Phil doing melodic scat singing before it all comes crashing down.

  • I didn't know about the media thread. Clearly, because I didn't bother my arse looking carefully enough. Sorry bout that mr moderator man!

    You may have perceived a tone in my message that was entirely unintended. You'd pre-emptively apologised in case the RS piece had been discussed in another thread, my reply was saying that we do have a media thread but no the article wasn't mentioned there. I wasn't having a crack at you for a lack of media-thread-checking competence!

    Abandon all reason

  • That explains why Jon Favreau referred to a scene in one of the Star Wars films as a "deep cut" in a recent documentary I watched. Who comes up with these idioms? I'd love to know so I can smack them upside the head as a reminder that the language was working perfectly well before they started dicking about with it.

    Well, that figures, resorting to violence, physical or metaphorical, seems like your modus operandi. (That's Latin, I didn't create that one! :))

    Ian


    Works with chess - Not with life

  • You may have perceived a tone in my message that was entirely unintended. You'd pre-emptively apologised in case the RS piece had been discussed in another thread, my reply was saying that we do have a media thread but no the article wasn't mentioned there. I wasn't having a crack at you for a lack of media-thread-checking competence!

    Its all good I was having a crack at myself! I am extraordinarily lazy and didn't snoop around before posting.

  • Yes I've only just recently started hearing that but in the context I realised what it meant.


    The one I've heard for a few years and which, admittedly disproportionately, irritates me is "drop" as in "they dropped a new album/tune". Also, when someone's done really well at something they "smashed it" 🤢 Both those make me shudder.


    The one could follow the other - someone drops something and smashes it.

    Last night I said to hubby how annoyed I am with the word 'drop' regarding new music. He suggested that music isn't physically 'released' any more because of streaming. Well, yes, perhaps. It doesn't make 'drop' any more appropriate.


    Regarding the article I've read it before & agree with most of it.