• 'Things and people not being what they appear'? And you're linking that with psychedelia: ...erm.....yeah; no one would argue with that. Anything else, beyond stating the obvious?

    No, I wasn't linking that theme with psychedelia, I was saying that while the lyric comes across as a bit cod-psychedelic, there is a flavour of meaning to it, as described.

    Abandon all reason

  • I was listening to RedBeard's show on Fragile this afternoon, featuring interviews with Jon and Rick, and RedBeard made a salient point about progressive rock and mainstream music and the conceit that the two did not make comfortable bedfellows. Albums such as Fragile proved that it was possible to be both progressive and popular, thus debunking the notion that so-called intelligent and complex music doesn't connect with the masses. One in the eye for the musical snobs.

  • Is anyone a fan here? (I know the answer is "yes", but I thought I would be polite. ^^ )


    Is anyone attending the 50th Anniversary celebration in Philadelphia on July 21st? I'm seeing it and the show in the Fillmore that evening. Here's info on the fan fest:


    http://yesworld.com/2018/05/yesfanfest-50-true-summers/

    ...and now this anniversary celebration and Philly-based shows are imminent! 8):thumbup:


    I can't wait!

    Stepping out the back way, hoping nobody sees...

  • Yes - featuring Anderson, Wakeman and Rabin live at the Apollo.


    As Counting Out Time already mentioned, it is one of the most enjoyable live albums from a Yes line-up since keys to ascension. It has some remarkable highs and some lows as well.


    On the positive side:


    All the songs have received a new arrangement, which makes them sound new and fresh. Only Awaken sounds a bit lame. The tremendous church organ solo is missing. So it leaves you a bit disappointed.

    The sound and the production are excellent. And so is the performance of the band overall. Lee Pomeroy plays a tremendous bass. His work on the album is the most enjoyable part of the performance.


    On the negative side:


    Alan White is sorely missing. Lou Molino is quite a decent drummer, but he is far from giving the songs the power, that Alan White can bring to them.

    The overdubbed applause on all the tracks is superfluous and annoying at times. Good, that it doesn't come out too much in the mix.


    All in all an album, I would recommend to any fan of the band. I like it a lot.

    First we learned to walk on water.

    Then we tried something harder.

    - Red Seven -

  • Lou Molino: Long time since I've seen his name, started out as Cock Robin's drummer, last I heard, he was with the Tubes.

    Ian


    There is a church bell

    That rings on the hour

    Filling the streets

    Stopping the world awhile

  • I was listening to RedBeard's show on Fragile this afternoon, featuring interviews with Jon and Rick, and RedBeard made a salient point about progressive rock and mainstream music and the conceit that the two did not make comfortable bedfellows. Albums such as Fragile proved that it was possible to be both progressive and popular, thus debunking the notion that so-called intelligent and complex music doesn't connect with the masses. One in the eye for the musical snobs.

    Yes, like Genesis were able to write accesable music that was also complex. That's a true skill in songwriting. Some prog rock is merely complex and devoid of anything for a mianstream music audience to latch on to; no obvious melody, ever changing time sigs for the sake of it etc..


    There's plenty of room in prog rock for al kinds of approaches to making music of course, that's the beauty of the genre, but yes, I agree there is plenty of accessable progressive rock out there, and people forget tha for a time the likes of Yes, ELP and Tull were huge bands with enormous followings, who did actually have hit singles as well as platinum selling albums.

  • I've seen Yes numerous times over the past many decades, and quite often I was blown away by their performances. Recently, I obtained the Blu-ray of Anderson, Rabin and Wakeman 'Live At The Apollo,' recorded in Manchester in 2017. The last time I was blown away by such a fabulbous Yes gig was in 1991 for the Union tour. Wow, all I can say is get a copy of the ARW DVD. Jon has never been in better shape, physically or vocally. Kudos also to bassist Lee Pomeroy and drummer Lou Molino.


  • I've seen Yes numerous times over the past many decades, and quite often I was blown away by their performances. Recently, I obtained the Blu-ray of Anderson, Rabin and Wakeman 'Live At The Apollo,' recorded in Manchester in 2017. The last time I was blown away by such a fabulbous Yes gig was in 1991 for the Union tour. Wow, all I can say is get a copy of the ARW DVD. Jon has never been in better shape, physically or vocally. Kudos also to bassist Lee Pomeroy and drummer Lou Molino.


    That is a very good video!


    They did actually play "The Gates Of Delirium"! :huh: And they played it very well! I'm glad they dipped into the back catalogue: they also played "No Opportunity Necessary", "America", "Going ForThe One", "Siberian Khatru", "Onward", "Tempus Fugit", "Rhythm Of Love", and a cover of John Lennon's "Imagine" (Yes' drummer Alan White played on the original and last night).


    Just a great show! 8)

    Stepping out the back way, hoping nobody sees...

  • That is a very good video!


    They did actually play "The Gates Of Delirium"! :huh: And they played it very well! I'm glad they dipped into the back catalogue: they also played "No Opportunity Necessary", "America", "Going ForThe One", "Siberian Khatru", "Onward", "Tempus Fugit", "Rhythm Of Love", and a cover of John Lennon's "Imagine" (Yes' drummer Alan White played on the original and last night).


    Just a great show! 8)

    I watched Gates and Imagine, there are very good quality videos on YT.

    That's a good set list, and Steve Howe still gives it his all, but man, in every video I've seen of them in the last few years, the songs are just so plodding and lifeless. Alan White is just kind of... there, adding essentially nothing, barely keeping up during Gates, while Jay Schellen (who?) does all the actual drumming. Jon Davison is a rather pale imitation of the lead vocal spot. He can reach the notes, but the soul and richness of Jon Anderson's voice just isn't there, it's so thin in comparison. Sherwood and Downes are good players, and I know Squire wanted Sherwood to help the band continue on... but to me it just isn't Yes. I want it to be, but I just can't feel that way when we are now missing so many of the original musicians. It's one thing to replace a key member, but to replace three or four key members in a five piece band?

    The last time I saw them live was in 2002. An absolutely amazing, transcendent concert where they played Awaken, Revealing Science, etc. - and that wasn't even their golden age. But even at that later stage of their career they still had Jon Anderson, Chris Squire, Rick Wakeman, Steve Howe and Alan White. The guys who wrote and recorded those tunes. Now, three of those are gone, and a fourth, Alan, is barely there for most of the show - basically only there to add a bit of credibility, I think.

    I don't begrudge the guys for going out there and earning their living. More power to them, and if people go and enjoy the show - great! I just can't do it anymore personally. I'm so disheartened whenever I watch these modern videos. In the end, it's only a band name, it's not the end of the world and I am not one of those people who thinks they are "ruining a legacy" or any such nonsense. It's just that, to me, some bands have members that are irreplaceable.

  • ...

    The last time I saw them live was in 2002. An absolutely amazing, transcendent concert where they played Awaken, Revealing Science, etc. - and that wasn't even their golden age...

    I don't begrudge the guys for going out there and earning their living. More power to them, and if people go and enjoy the show - great! I just can't do it anymore personally. ... In the end, it's only a band name, it's not the end of the world and I am not one of those people who thinks they are "ruining a legacy" or any such nonsense. It's just that, to me, some bands have members that are irreplaceable.


    That was the last time I saw them as well (perhaps you were at the same show, Kingswood in Toronto). I recall Chris milking every bit of that bass solo in the middle of Heart of the Sunrise, and I loved it. Every thing Rick Wakeman added seemed magical. I have very fond memories of that show.


    I also totally agree with your latter point.

    Whenever I've read comments suggesting certain bands or musicians shouldn't tour or record anymore because it's ruining their legacy, I think, what a load of baloney.

    Great albums like Close To The Edge don't depreciate or rest on a band's legacy, they are valued on their own merits.

  • That was the last time I saw them as well (perhaps you were at the same show, Kingswood in Toronto). I recall Chris milking every bit of that bass solo in the middle of Heart of the Sunrise, and I loved it. Every thing Rick Wakeman added seemed magical. I have very fond memories of that show.


    I also totally agree with your latter point.

    Whenever I've read comments suggesting certain bands or musicians shouldn't tour or record anymore because it's ruining their legacy, I think, what a load of baloney.

    Great albums like Close To The Edge don't depreciate or rest on a band's legacy, they are valued on their own merits.

    It was the Molson Amphitheatre (now called the Budweiser Stage) at Ontario Place actually, you may be confusing it with Kingswood which is at Canada's Wonderland. But yes, it was a spectacular concert. We were in the fourth row on the Squire/Wakeman side, and Squire absolutely stole the show. Awaken was transcendent, and stuff like Revealing Science, America, Siberian Khatru etc. was just amazing. Nothing can erase those treasured memories! :)

  • It was the Molson Amphitheatre (now called the Budweiser Stage) at Ontario Place actually, you may be confusing it with Kingswood which is at Canada's Wonderland. ...

    That makes sense, because I remember being out in the cool air, walking and chatting with the friend I was with afterwards and heading to get onto the TTC, whereas if it was at the Kingswood, I would have driven there.

  • I agree that musicians should absolutely carry on doing what they want to do and if people enjoy it, that's great. But for similar reasons as above, it's not for me. I can take a Yes lineup without Wakeman... just. But as he himself has said, without Anderson it's not Yes.


    The Anderson Wakeman Rabin show I saw in 2017 felt like Yes to me even without the name.

    Abandon all reason

  • I've seen Yes numerous times over the past many decades, and quite often I was blown away by their performances. Recently, I obtained the Blu-ray of Anderson, Rabin and Wakeman 'Live At The Apollo,' recorded in Manchester in 2017. The last time I was blown away by such a fabulbous Yes gig was in 1991 for the Union tour. Wow, all I can say is get a copy of the ARW DVD. Jon has never been in better shape, physically or vocally. Kudos also to bassist Lee Pomeroy and drummer Lou Molino.


    Sent my copy back. Whoever decided to add the constant, irritating and unnecessary applause and cheering throughout the gig needs sacked. The band clearly didn't hear the final product. It even has shots of the audience quietly sitting listening intently yet cheers and applause as if someone famous had walked out onto the stage is in the background. I couldn't stand it and sent the blu ray back. Performance wise it's great (despite overdubs of Rabin,'s guitar) but if they rereleased it without the horrid added crowd noise then I would buy it.