• What bands have been influenced by The Beatles 'cos I can't think of any. Over-hyped, yes they fit the tag, as well as 'kajillions' liking them there are plenty of us that just don't get it - much ado about nothing springs to mind.

    This is the first is a series of videos of other artists talking about The Beatles and their influence. Note how diverse the people are: Lemme, Roger Waters, Pete Townshend, Billy Joel, Freddie Mercury, Bob Marley, David Bowie, Sting, etc. In subsequent videos there are Anthrax, Linkin Park, Phil Collins (video 5), Dave Grohl, Henry Rollins...



    You sounded like you didn't believe that Tears for Fears were influenced by The Beatles. Listen to Sowing the Seeds of Love and compare with I Am the Walrus. When they performed this song live, they often added a snippet of All You Need Is Love at the end.

  • There will be A one hour documentary of the legend that is Sir Paul McCartney with James Cordon on CBS. Will be viewed on the 20th of August.

  • This is the first is a series of videos of other artists talking about The Beatles and their influence. Note how diverse the people are: Lemme, Roger Waters, Pete Townshend, Billy Joel, Freddie Mercury, Bob Marley, David Bowie, Sting, etc. In subsequent videos there are Anthrax, Linkin Park, Phil Collins (video 5), Dave Grohl, Henry Rollins...



    You sounded like you didn't believe that Tears for Fears were influenced by The Beatles. Listen to Sowing the Seeds of Love and compare with I Am the Walrus. When they performed this song live, they often added a snippet of All You Need Is Love at the end.

    I guess it would be quicker and shorter to find some artists who haven't been influenced by them or doesn't care for them, like Keith Richards, although Keith has seldom anything nice to say about other artists: The Who and Zeppelin for instance and even so, as long as the Beatles have been around or at least up to 68, the Rolling Stones had always been looking what the Beatles were doing, it was hardly the case the other way around.

    Edited once, last by Fabrizio ().

  • Who said you are expected to defend the Beatles? I don't particularly like the Beatles, but I acknowledge their influence and effect on popular music. Graeme Edge of the Moody Blues (who toured with them, Mike Pinder and Ray Thomas were friends who performed on a couple of the songs) has said he doesn't own a single record of theirs, but accepts, and is grateful for, the fact that they did what they did to the music scene.

    As for influenced bands, how about Barclay James Harvest, whose songs include "John Lennon's Guitar" (which he borrowed to record "Galadriel" the day before, in his words "His heroes split"), and "Titles" a song made up of Beatles songs titles.

    Ian


    Works with chess - Not with life

  • There will be A one hour documentary of the legend that is Sir Paul McCartney with James Cordon on CBS. Will be viewed on the 20th of August.

    Not a lot of difference from the 20 minute version I posted via YouTube. The only difference there's more songs from the pub shown here!... ;)

  • I've been planning a 4-disc Beatles compilation and only just recently got around to it. As usual with my compilations, not chronological and all very carefully planned in terms of running order.


    DISC 1

    Paperback Writer

    Twist and Shout

    All My Loving

    Dear Prudence

    Tell Me Why

    I Want To Tell You

    Your Mother Should Know

    Sgt Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band

    With A Little Help From My Friends

    If I Needed Someone

    You Never Give Me Your Money

    Sun King

    Mean Mr Mustard

    Polythene Pam

    She Came In Through The Bathroom Window

    Revolution

    Love Me Do

    The Word

    From Me To You

    I’ll Follow The Sun

    Don’t Let Me Down

    Blackbird

    I’ve Got A Feeling

    She Said She Said

    A Hard Day’s Night

    I Want To Hold Your Hand

    Yes It Is


    DISC 2

    Eight Days A Week

    And Your Bird Can Sing

    Old Brown Shoe

    Happiness Is A Warm Gun

    We Can Work It Out

    Fixing A Hole

    Help!

    You Won’t See Me

    I’m Only Sleeping

    Every Little Thing

    Michelle

    Yer Blues

    Two Of Us

    Matchbox

    Things We Said Today

    Ticket To Ride

    Oh! Darling

    Mother Nature’s Son

    I Should Have Known Better

    Yellow Submarine

    Helter Skelter

    Bad Boy

    Rain

    You’ve Got To Hide Your Love Away

    Hello Goodbye



    DISC 3

    Getting Better

    Can’t Buy Me Love

    For No One

    I’m So Tired

    The Night Before

    Love You To

    The Fool on the Hill

    Sexy Sadie

    Drive My Car

    It Won’t Be Long

    Think For Yourself

    Here, There and Everywhere

    I Feel Fine

    Eleanor Rigby

    I Want You (She’s So Heavy)

    Blue Jay Way

    Strawberry Fields Forever

    Hey Bulldog

    She Loves You

    Norwegian Wood

    Lady Madonna

    She’s Leaving Home

    Hey Jude


    DISC 4

    Get Back

    Please Please Me

    It’s All Too Much

    What You’re Doing

    Yesterday

    Because

    Doctor Robert

    And I Love Her

    Come and Get It

    For You Blue

    Cry Baby Cry

    Revolution 9 (edit)

    Good Night

    Come Together

    Penny Lane

    Taxman

    Sgt Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band (reprise)

    A Day in the Life

    Something

    Tomorrow Never Knows

    The Long and Winding Road

    Let It Be

    I Saw Her Standing There

    Golden Slumbers

    Carry That Weight

    The End

    In My Life

    Abandon all reason

  • Good set list !!!......8):thumbup:

  • Good set list !!!......8):thumbup:

    😄


    Imagine that - a 102-song set list!


    In fact technically it's 103 - it's not listed but between Good Night and Come Together I stuck that 30 seconds of cacophony that follows A Day In The Life.

    Abandon all reason

  • Some astonishing, magnificent stuff there - if I had to pick one out of the four to play first, it would be the third one. Those first five songs - what a sequence. I love The Night Before which I think is almost as good as the more celebrated No Reply.

  • Some astonishing, magnificent stuff there - if I had to pick one out of the four to play first, it would be the third one. Those first five songs - what a sequence. I love The Night Before which I think is almost as good as the more celebrated No Reply.

    Always glad to hear from someone who's also a fan of some of those - Getting Better and For No One are two of my favourite Paul songs. I like the curious detachment of For No One, unusual for him. But the lovely rising-falling melody is very typical.


    I'm So Tired is a fave from the White Album and has not only possibly my most liked John lyric but also its scathing delivery - "curse Sir Walter Raleigh, he was such a stupid get!"


    I think I very slightly prefer the discs in order so I'd pick out disc 4 but there's not much in it. With my 6-disc Genesis comp here Your 'best of Genesis' compilation (embedding not working) I find myself mostly playing disc 5, followed by 6, as it has the best range of stuff.

    Abandon all reason

  • Curious to hear more about your reasons for the running order of the songs, as it sounds like you had thought a lot about it. Also interested to hear about how you decided what to leave out.

  • This is an awesome collection of songs you put together.


    Quote


    Getting Better and For No One are two of my favourite Paul songs. I like the curious detachment of For No One, unusual for him. But the lovely rising-falling melody is very typical.

    I'm a huge fan of both of these especially For No One. It's a song that to me you think is played too fast and yet when I have heard Paul sing it slower it doesn't do the justice as the original version does for me. The French horn blows the song out of the water in my opinion! It amazes me that Paul played most of the instruments on that song besides Ringo I believe on drums and of course the French Horn.


    Finally you can never go wrong with these songs:

    Quote

    Golden Slumbers

    Carry That Weight

    The End

    In My Life

    GS/CTW/TE to me are just the most amazing melodies! To me the drum/guitar solos on The End are so impressive because everyone had a chance to really take a stab at a killer solo and to me it really worked! I know Phil recorded it years later I guess with George Martin helping but I still think The Beatles' version is one that stands on its own and I don't think can ever be topped!

  • Curious to hear more about your reasons for the running order of the songs, as it sounds like you had thought a lot about it. Also interested to hear about how you decided what to leave out.

    I took the approach I generally do when making compilations of a particular artist - I went through each album (and in this case non-album singles/b-sides) and picked out the ones I'd ideally include. Having decided beforehand it would be 4 x 80-minute discs I then matched the list with that capacity to see if there were any I needed to drop. There weren't really, everything I picked could've fitted in, but as I went along I dropped a few anyway for no firm reason other than they suddenly felt less favoured. Girl and Julia are two that were in that category.


    I already knew there were key tracks I'd include regardless, being either firm favourites of mine or having what I regard as some significance, including:


    Love Me Do

    I Saw Her Standing There

    Twist & Shout

    The Abbey Road medley

    Taxman

    Eleanor Rigby

    Tomorrow Never Knows

    Every Little Thing

    Rain

    She Said She Said

    Penny Lane

    Come Together

    Something

    Come & Get It


    A few others too, plus I already knew I wanted the 3-song closing sequence of the White Album intact as I find it very striking and somewhat creepy, though for timing reasons I had to cut R9 and it's the easily most editable.


    There are a few warmly regarded ones, probably seen as classics but which I've never much liked, e.g. Here Comes The Sun, While My Guitar, Walrus, Lucy In The Sky, Day Tripper, hence they're not included.


    I'd already decided Paperback Writer would start the whole thing and In My Life end it. With those bookends, I then wrote down from my pick-list a running order. I'm not sure I can fully describe how I do that other than thinking what will sound good in a sequence, having a mix of different dynamics/feels/textures, while trying to avoid too much bunching of certain albums or John/Paul tracks. I always want to have something that to me sounds good as an opener or closer. e.g. Getting Better and Hey Jude sound good in those respective roles, whereas Fixing A Hole and Don't Let Me Down wouldn't.


    All that left a minimal bit of re-ordering and disc-switching. 1 and 2 still have capacity so I could still tweak them with additions but have no plans to yet.

    Abandon all reason

  • I think I would like to know why Doctor Robert, another favourite of mine, is between Because & And I Love Her!

    Probably nothing more than I liked the idea of going up-tempo after Because, then taking it back to a more sedate feel after Dr Robert. Also partly that on the album, Because is followed by the wistful reflective opening of You Never and I wanted a different transition.


    In compilations I consciously try to do different things with tracks than what the artist did on the source album, e.g. not using openers and closers that they did.

    Abandon all reason

  • Makes sense in terms of the shifting tempos, textures, and authorships. I figured the obvious omissions were just personal taste.

  • Ringo Starr is about to turn 80, I gather.


    Nah. I'm going to think of him as being.... 63. That works.


    While I'm at it, Macca can be too.


    There. That's better.

    Abandon all reason

  • Being born in the 70's I've been aware of The Beatles and the individual members all of my life but never really gone out of my way to listen to them. Of course it didn't mean I didn't hear them on the radio, TV, films or being covered by other artists so it was hard to not be at least familiar with some of their output.


    However it wasn't until the 2010 reissues of the Red and Blue albums that I decided to dip a toe in and buy some of their albums. For quite a while I thought this was all The Beatles I needed. This changed one day in late 2019 when I saw several of their studio albums going cheap in my local Sainsbury's: Rubber Soul, Revolver, Sgt Pepper, Abbey Road and Let It Be. At this point I knew enough that Sgt Pepper was not only revered as one of, if not the best, albums by the group themselves but also possibly of all time. Based on that I thought it was worth a punt as my first Fab Four studio album proper.


    Long story short, I loved it and decided it was worth taking a chance on the other albums I'd seen too. Enjoyed them just as much although found Let It Be to be a bit of a come down from what went before. Although further reading lead me to realise this was not much of a surprise. Anyway, from here I quickly picked up the White Album as the missing main album in the run of albums I now had. For about a month I immersed myself in this new found music when HMV had a price crash on Beatles albums. Striking quickly I picked up all the missing studio albums plus Past Masters.


    I've been enjoying them ever since. Key takeaways for me which may seem obvious were that I finally better understood why The Beatles have the reputation they have. I was aware of it, of course, but without really immersing myself in the music I had no way of understanding exactly what influence they had. I'd always been wary of people my age or younger who would state that The Beatles were the best band ever in their opinion. I'd always wonder whether they had truly come to that opinion themselves or were they influenced by what history told us. Having worked my way through their catalogue I got it. Not only did I now appreciate how they developed in such a short period of time but I also realised how - from Rubber Soul onwards at least - what they were doing to resonate into other post-Beatles bands I was a fan of - both subtlely and not so subtlely - in terms of the range of song writing, album construction and sound. Rubber Soul particularly seems to me to be the major blue-print for Brit Pop which wouldn't happen for another 30 years.

  • Brilliantly put, jaydubya. What an excellent summing-up of your Beatles 'journey' if you'll excuse me using that tiresome expression. And you won't be the only one with that sort of experience by a long way.


    Like you, I'd always been a bit less receptive to the pre-Rubber Soul stuff, while recognising its seismic effect on popular culture. My musical preference will always be post-65 but I've gradually come to appreciate the earlier material more, and to see how revolutionary it was eg how Love Me Do was actually quite shocking in its sparse, stark nature and how it stood jarringly out to the rest of the chart hits at the time.

    Abandon all reason