Nursery Cryme

  • Cottage?

    Yes, the one TLLDOB was recorded in, as it was that album I was discussing when I referred to it. Read back over the thread, all will become clear. We'd wandered off topic onto production values.

    Ian


    Putting the old-fashioned Staffordshire plate in the dishwasher!

  • Yes, the one TLLDOB was recorded in, as it was that album I was discussing when I referred to it. Read back over the thread, all will become clear. We'd wandered off topic onto production values.

    Ah right, it might have thrown me as I always thought of Headley Grange as a big house while mention of a cottage confused me into thinking of Christmas Cottage. Yeah I'm sure the dark atmosphere there they've often described had an effect on the music and the sound.

    Abandon all reason

  • Ah right, it might have thrown me as I always thought of Headley Grange as a big house while mention of a cottage confused me into thinking of Christmas Cottage. Yeah I'm sure the dark atmosphere there they've often described had an effect on the music and the sound.

    Phil tells a great story about them writing The Waiting Room at Headley Grange. In fact, the stories of the band's experiences in that place are almost as fascinating as the music that they created there.

  • I thought it was Trespass, not Nursery Cryme, that was rehearsed at The Maltings, the cottage owned by a family friend.

    They wrote and rehearsed for about six months in Christmas Cottage in Wotton near Dorking, which was owned by Richard Macphail's parents. That's where Trespass was written and rehearsed. The Maltings is in the centre of Farnham, an old maltings that at the time was disused but shortly after was renovated as an arts centre. They began rehearsing there just after Phil joined. Nursery Cryme was rehearsed and partially written at Luxford House, near Crowborough on East Sussex - Tony Stratton-Smith was renting it at the time. There's a picture of it in the gatefold sleeve of Van der Graaf's Pawn Hearts.

  • Interesting review. I have a couple of questions about who writes some of the lyrics. The reviewer seems to attribute Fountain of Salmacis to Gabriel where I always thought it was Rutherford. I think I had read that somewhere and also recall reading that he was particularly into mythology. He wrote the lyrics to Squonk, so that fits too. Anyone know for sure?


    He also credits the lyrics to Hogweed to Gabriel, which I think is correct, but at one time questioned it because it doesn't rhyme, which is more characteristic of Banks. Certainly the content seems Gabrielesque, particularly its poking fun at British royalty. I do think this is Gabriel, but was wondering if anyone knew for sure.

    While we await the sudden influx of people's opinions on NC here's a review I recently came across on Julian Cope's Head Heritage site.

    • Official Post

    I first heard Nursery Cryme when I was maybe 10 years old. I was obsessed with Phil and his solo stuff, and the mid 80’s Genesis stuff. I got it as a Christmas gift one year, it probably was the first CD my parents randomly picked off the shelf at the store (it could have been the Lamb with that being the case; what 10 year old doesn’t want to learn about testicle monsters!) Hearing N.C. for the first time was like someone pouring a bucket of cold water on your head. I was shocked. How can this be Genesis?! It sounded so Victorian or Baroque or something very foreign at the time to my ears. I listened to it a handful of times, liked it in an obligatory kind of way, and put it away. Occasionally through the years I would listen to it, never getting the meaning behind the songs. It eventually clicked for me, and it’s one of my favorites now. Hogweed is freakin hilarious! Those first few lines, “Turn and run, nothing can stop them!” get me every time. Peter singing about killer plant life with such seriousness makes me laugh out loud. The Musical Box is epic, especially the old man lyrics at the end. Harold the Barrell is like Monty Python-esque in a way. Their sense of humor is one of the things I adore about this band. For absent Friends, Seven Stones, and Harlequin, are perfect beauties on this album. Fountain of Salmacis is a grand epic finale, Hackett’s guitar work is amazing. It’s like a perfect lead in to Watcher of the Skies on their next album. Is it perfection? No, definitely not. But it is a perfect buildup to Selling England, which may just be perfection, in my opinion.

    • Official Post

    Nursery Cryme is amazing. I also thought that they were co lead vocals on Harold the Barrel with Peter and Phil, as opposed to Phil doing a backing track. Hogweed has this menacing feel all the way through it, of course we’re talking about a killer plant here, which makes it hilarious at the same time. When Peter opens with, “Turn and Run!” I think that’s fantastic. The Musical Box is a gem, I love watching that version from the ‘72 Belgian TV show. Peter going nuts with the tambourine, and Phil on drums. When Steve does that screaming guitar part going into the instrumental section, it’s just awesome. Hard to believe they were like 21 when they made this album. For Absent Friends is a beautiful little song, very Beatles-esque. Seven Stones grows on me the more I listen to it. Harlequin and Fountain are solid songs, with the latter probably being my least favorite on the album.

  • ... and Fountain are solid songs, with the latter probably being my least favorite on the album.

    Always interesting to see completely differing views from people who share a passion for the same band.


    Fountain of Salmacis is not only my top track from that album, it's probably my overall favourite song by Genesis.

  • I like the melody and tempo of FoS, it generates a certain off kilter atmosphere that's unique to it, reminds me more of Trespass than what was to come (in a good way). Some of the lyrics are a little overwrought.

  • Since this thread has become live again, it seems time to point out to new members, and those who missed it before, that there is an episode of the period police drama Endeavour, (the Prequel series to Morse) based on the song The Musical Box.


    The episode is called "Nocturne", and is Series 2, Episode 2. You may find it on streaming services, in the UK, it'll likely turn up on ITV2, 3 or 4 sometime soon.


    If there's any doubt about the connection, take a look at some of the character names: "Endeavour" Nocturne (TV Episode 2014) - IMDb and, as the story also involves a murder 100 years before, names of people from the past will also be familiar.

    Ian


    Putting the old-fashioned Staffordshire plate in the dishwasher!

  • Yes, overwrought is exactly it. I was thinking pretentious...

    If you think that it's pretentious, you've been taken for a ride...

    “When the waitress asked if I wanted my pizza cut into four or eight slices, I said, ‘Four. I don’t think I can eat eight.’” -- Yogi Berra

  • "Tony says he & Peter wrote the lyrics for Fountain"


    Thank you! I've been wondering about that song for a long time.

    “When the waitress asked if I wanted my pizza cut into four or eight slices, I said, ‘Four. I don’t think I can eat eight.’” -- Yogi Berra

  • Bumping this up as I recently read about how Russia is currently living a Genesis song. A strain of hogweed (Sonowsky's) is rife, growing up to 5m high and emitting a sap that causes serious burns that are horribly painful and can take months to heal. It's highly invasive, and a single plant can distribute 100,000 seeds. Crank conspiracists are blaming it on the US carrying out "bacteriological warfare" (surely herbicidal?) against Russia. However, it's self-inflicted. The plants were brought in from their natural habitat in Caucasus Mountains after WWII as cheap livestock feed - though why you'd feed acid-filled plants to animals is beyond me - and it's spread since then, but seems to have gone even madder and is tearing its way across the country. The Moscow Times cites a forecast that the hogweed will "engulf almost all of Russia by 2050" if left unchecked.


    A rather horse/stable door edict from the government requires landowners to remove the weeds or face large fines. But surely the agitation of removing the weeds is going to further distribute the seeds and they'll be stuck in a vicious bota-NIC-al cycle.


    Oh well, never mind.

    Abandon all reason