First record or CD you ever owned

  • I had an early W&W, it said "Mastered by Sanyo" on the inner part of the disc, which explains everything! <X

    Completely agreed. <X ANYTHING back then by Sanyo was dreadful!


    For initial CD releases back in the 80s, the most underwhelming I ever heard were: the aforementioned W&W, "Machine Head" (Deep Purple), and "In The Court Of The Crimson King" (King Crimson, obviously). The source tape noise just drowned out most of the music - absolutely horrific mastering for CD, esp. the last two.

    Stepping out the back way, hoping nobody sees...

  • When I got my first CD player I could pick a CD from a selection and i chose Def Leppard Hysteria, think it was 1987, i still have that CD.

    Not a fan of them by any means but I love this album, everything else I have heard by them has left me cold.

  • My first LP was Kylie Minogue's debut album. What can I say? I was young, and I lacked the taste.

    Nothing wrong with some well-crafted pop and no need to explain it. That said, I much prefer her post-PWL stuff.


    Someone made the distinction between first vinyl and CD. I mentioned my first vinyl single and album, my first CD was Here Today Tomorrow Next Week by The Sugarcubes. I was a late starter cd-wise.

    Abandon all reason

  • My first CD purchase was ELO's 'Greatest Hits.' I remember playing it through my car stereo using a portable Sony CD player and a cassette adaptor. The sound blew me away.

  • First record I ever owned was the Star Wars soundtrack, which I got for Christmas as a kid. First music I ever bought with my own money was Kiss - "Heaven's On Fire" 45 single.


    In 1989 I got my first CD player and I immediately went out and bought Rush - Moving Pictures and Presto.

  • Nothing wrong with some well-crafted pop and no need to explain it. That said, I much prefer her post-PWL stuff.

    I agree, but Kylie's debut album was anything but well-crafted pop. It was the musical equivalent of the cheapest variety of industrially produced sweets, nothing but lots of sugar and flavouring chemicals in very loud colours.


    Your bringing up the distinction between the first LP and the first CD gives me an opportunity to atone for my lack of taste. My first CD was Nursery Cryme, bought about a year before I got my first CD player.

    ...cried a voice in the crowd.


  • In 1989 I got my first CD player and I immediately went out and bought Rush - Moving Pictures and Presto.

    Rush is a band I've tried to like but just get bored listening to them. The singer is the main cause. I cannot stand his voice.

  • Nothing wrong with some well-crafted pop and no need to explain it. That said, I much prefer her post-PWL stuff.


    Someone made the distinction between first vinyl and CD. I mentioned my first vinyl single and album, my first CD was Here Today Tomorrow Next Week by The Sugarcubes. I was a late starter cd-wise.

    Indeed, Kylie's best stuff is the deconstruction material, "put yourself in my place" and "Confide in me". She showed real promise, then threw it all away again!

    Ian


    There is a church bell

    That rings on the hour

    Filling the streets

    Stopping the world awhile

  • Before records and CDs there were cassettes! My older brother and sister had left me a bunch of old children's stories on cassettes: Pumuckl, Kaspar und Seppl, some Astrid Lindgren stories (Madita, Pippi Langstrumpf...) etc. My parents kept buying me more Pumuckl cassettes because I loved them so I ended up having quite a collection of these.


    My first records were just as well leftover stuff my dad left me. My dad had this workmate who sold him 2 or 3 boxes of vinyls for little money and I got everything my dad didn't want: again some Pumuckl records, the Smurfs Christmas songs, the Smurfs with Vader Abraham, a couple of German Volksmusik records, some classical records, finally along with it all The Alan Parsons Project's 'I Robot'.


    The first ever CD I got was a birthday gift from my dad's when I turned 13, it was Donald Fagen's Kamakiriad.


    The first records I bought myself were from a second hand store, they were Supertramp's Even In The Quietest Moments and Crisis? What Crisis?, Pink Floyd's Animals and The Beatles' Magical Mystery Tour (LP version, a HÖRZU special pressing, got it for 59,- DM).


    The first CD I bought was Robert Miles' Dreamland.

    The first CD maxi singles I bought were Chicane's Offshore and Sunstroke.

  • When I got my first CD player in 1986 I bought about 10 CDs. They included Band On The Run, Brothers In Arms, Dark Side Of The Moon & Beethoven's 9th conducted by Karajan.


    I have no idea when I started buying Genesis related CDs. I would have bought We Can't Dance when it was released. I have found some old diary notes which state that I bought Invisible Touch on 15/5/92. These notes also state that I bought But Seriously on 6/12/89 and Us on 16/10/92.

  • Indeed, Kylie's best stuff is the deconstruction material, "put yourself in my place" and "Confide in me". She showed real promise, then threw it all away again!

    Both excellent songs, really top-notch pop music. But I also like some of the stuff from the albums that followed. Good live performer too, very warm rapport with the audience.

    Abandon all reason

  • Rush is a band I've tried to like but just get bored listening to them. The singer is the main cause. I cannot stand his voice.

    The funny thing about Geddy Lee is that I think his voice improved over time - it was a "fans only" voice in the 70s, in the 80s it mellowed to a much more listenable degree, and in the 90s even more so. Only 3 studio albums were released in the new millennium (unless you include their covers album - I think it was called "Feedback"); his vocals are quite listenable on those too. Now the last couple of live releases they released before retiring you can hear the ravages of older years a bit on them. However, I would say from "Permanent Waves" onward, his voice suits the music quite well.


    I do understand how non-fans wouldn't care for his singing in the 70s - even he is critical of it. But his voice is more listenable, to me, than a singer like, say, Roger Chapman from Family. That vibrato just absolutely nauseates me. <X

    Stepping out the back way, hoping nobody sees...

  • The funny thing about Geddy Lee is that I think his voice improved over time - it was a "fans only" voice in the 70s, in the 80s it mellowed to a much more listenable degree, and in the 90s even more so. Only 3 studio albums were released in the new millennium (unless you include their covers album - I think it was called "Feedback"); his vocals are quite listenable on those too. Now the last couple of live releases they released before retiring you can hear the ravages of older years a bit on them. However, I would say from "Permanent Waves" onward, his voice suits the music quite well.


    I do understand how non-fans wouldn't care for his singing in the 70s - even he is critical of it. But his voice is more listenable, to me, than a singer like, say, Roger Chapman from Family. That vibrato just absolutely nauseates me. <X

    Yeah GL's voice has always been very divisive. I've never minded it but get why some would hate it. It's a pity if on its own it puts some off as a lot of their music is superb.

    Abandon all reason

  • First Single The Rods Do Anything You Wanna Do

    First Album on cassette (and Only album on cassette) Abba Arrival

    First Vinyl Album Status Quo Rockin' All Over The World

  • I had an older cousin and brother who were both into rock and had a lot of albums between them. I had access to all of them so never bought one of my own til I was 15 or 16.


    After seeing the W&W tour I had to get Seconds Out as soon as it was available, and proud to say that was the first record I ever bought.